Ready for Attitude Flying?

Avoid Hazardous Attitudes

Captain Judy’s Corner: Avoid Hazardous Flying Attitudes Is it important to verify checkpoints? Hazardous flying attitudes can occur at any time. I knew myself fairly well when I started flying lessons at age 40. Or so I thought. The long solo cross-country was when I discovered what I did not know. During that flight, I had not properly timed or verified checkpoints resulting in becoming completely off-course. My drive home from this particular flight provided reflection on how to be a better pilot. I’d replayed each skill set. I flew the airplane well and used the checklist regularly but was consistently lost. What surprised me was how many times I said to myself, “That check point is only slightly off … Read more

Aeromedical Part 2: Hypoxia

Hypoxia Captain Judy Rice

Captain Judy Rice and Navigator Fred by their Cirrus SR22T during the National Tour Captain Judy’s Corner: Aeromedical Part 2 – Hypoxia “Are my lips blue…?” Hypoxia aeromedical awareness matters. The Cirrus SR22T effortlessly reached the altitude of 8,500 MSL. The turbocharged airplane had a built-in oxygen system for higher altitudes. The maximum altitudes along our 3-month national tour would not exceed 10,000 MSL. It seemed unlikely we would be using the Cirrus oxygen system according to oxygen requirements when flying 12,500 MSL for over 30 minutes as stated in FAR 91.211. We had reached our crossing altitude before approaching the Arizona mountain ridges. I focused on clearing the ridges with ample altitude if encountering turbulence. We were safely on … Read more

Aeromedical Part 1: Motion Sickness

Motion Sickness Aeromedical Conditions

Captain Judy’s Corner: Aeromedical Part 1 – Motion Sickness “I alerted my aerobatic instructor…” My earliest memory of riding in a car was leaning out the window for fresh air and positioning my head carefully into a brown paper bag while my stomach was churning. My parents reassured that eventually I would outgrow these queasy moments. At a very young age, I learned to avoid looking down, such as looking at picture books, if I were inside a moving vehicle. I also always had water, sat next to a window, and if all of these precautions did not work, then the brown paper bag was nearby. Can flying a plane cause motion sickness? My first experiences as a student pilot … Read more

Technology and Problem-Solving

Captain Judy Rice Madrid

Madrid, Spain: Captain Judy Rice with Madrid students Captain Judy’s Corner: Pilot Technology and Problem-Solving “Our fuel stop was forecasting ceilings (clouds) at the lowest landing minimums and a slow moving line of thunderstorms…” Pilots rely on technology and problem-solving skills. My crew met me in the lobby for a quick cup of coffee before checking weather and then pre-flighting the Citation. We had our flight plan on file from our departure: Regina, Canada (CYQR) to Churchill, Canada (CYYQ) for a fuel stop, and then to Iqaluit, Canada (CYFB). This would be our final destination on our second night of this world flight voyage. Our fuel stop was forecasting ceilings (clouds) at the lowest landing minimums. There was a slow-moving … Read more

The Importance of Visas

Importance of Visas

Captain Judy’s Corner: The Importance of Visas for Pilots “I did what I could, and it’s out of my control…” I’d been asleep about two hours before being awakened by the call. We had a long day and an early departure in the morning for Saudi Arabia. “I did what he could, and it’s out of my control,” said the heavily accented voice on the other end of the call. Our landing permit was denied due to a visa issue, according to our caller. What happens when you don’t have a visa? The Saudi Arabia Visa office had now denied our entry for the third time. I was in the United States for the first two denials, allowing time to … Read more

Shared Goals, Shared Knowledge, Mutual Respect

Shared Goals and Knowledge

Shared Goals, Shared Knowledge, and Mutual Respect Captain Judy’s Corner What do shared goals, shared knowledge, and mutual respect have to do with a major airline, a world flight, and Epic Flight Academy? “Citation N178SF, do you need assistance?” The Sakhalinsk air traffic controller gave us a straight-out departure on Runway 19. I was flying left seat, and my first officer, Edwin, was busy with communications. I had almost thawed from the biting Russian cold. The Citation climbed effortlessly at 3,000 feet per minute. As we climbed through solid gray clouds, the advanced avionics technology displayed on our glass cockpit went blank! Both displays were totally dark, leaving us with no instruments or navigation aids. We were in the ‘soup,’ … Read more