Life style in campus - Forum Topic

Epic Flight Academy Forums Epic Flight Academy Campus Life style in campus

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  • #17988
    Ositadinma
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    Dealing With Roommates

    Having a college roommate is most people’s first experience living with someone who is not related to them. It comes with both benefits and challenges. Getting along with your college roommate can enhance your college experience. You get an instant friend, someone to confide in and keep you company during your first time away from home. However, since many colleges randomly assign your first roommate, you also run the risk of being matched with someone you find challenging or don’t relate to right away. Either way, here’s some good advice:

    Establish some rules at the beginning.
    Make your preferences known from the start so you and your roommate are clear on what to do to avoid conflict. Establish what space is whose, when you need quiet time to study, which items you can share, what time you go to bed, if you like to sleep in on weekends and who’s allowed to eat what in the refrigerator.

    Some residence halls even require roommates to write up a roommate contract to put your rules in writing. Perhaps this is something you and your roommate could do on your own. Make it a fun introductory exercise and hang your contract somewhere in your room as a reminder. This way, if you do find yourselves disagreeing, you have something to help negotiate a solution that works for both of you.

    Have good communication.
    Practicing direct communication will help you in good times and bad. Dorm rooms are close quarters, so even if you get along with your roommate, there is bound to be a conflict or two. Handle such conflicts with open communication. You can’t expect your roommate to be a mind reader, so if you get upset or frustrated, communicate it to your roommate right away. Use a respectful tone and choose your words carefully. You’ll find such communication gets better reception and ultimately a better response than if you just attack or criticize.

    Good communication also comes into play during everyday interactions. Try to engage your roommate. Ask how his or her day was or congratulate him or her on that good essay score. A little praise and interest can go a long way.

    You need to compromise.
    Whenever you’re dealing with the wants and needs of other people, you need to compromise. When it comes to doing chores around the room, listening to certain kinds of music, watching different TV shows and requesting privacy, compromise is key. If you give a little, your roommate will give a little. Compromising does not mean giving in to all of someone’s requests; it means coming to a mutual agreement. So, utilize positive communication, and talk through the things you and your roommate differ on until you can reach a compromise.

    Even if you find yourself in a situation where you and your roommate just don’t get along, moving out should be the last resort. Dealing with roommate conflict can be an important lesson, and moving out is a hassle. However, if the situation is burdening you after three months, it may be in both your best interests to consult student housing. You can always talk to your Resident Advisor (RA) and ask for help to resolve conflict.

    Go ahead and sit in on a few classes of the majors you are seriously considering. Chat with the students in class and ask for their impressions on the major. Also, speak with the professor to ask questions about coursework expectations and major requirements. You may even want to get an internship in a field you are considering. There is no better way to evaluate a field than to get firsthand experience.
    Managing Academics

    During your first year of college you will be juggling many new experiences: new friends, new living situation, new activities, new classes and new teachers. While a lot of these new experiences are exciting, they can challenge your time-management skills and academic adjustment. Even if you balanced a full course load and extracurricular activities in high school, in college you alone are responsible for deciding what your schedule will hold and managing your time accordingly. Set up some structure by giving yourself specific study hours, setting some goals for time management and sticking to them. And, do your best to eat well and get enough sleep.

    #17989

    Thank you for sharing these pointers on making the roommate experience a pleasant one! Keep in mind, at Epic your training is much shorter than earning a 4-year college degree so a student pilot will likely be sharing a room for no more than 12 months.

    Thank you for using our Pilot Forum!

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